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Appointments
6 December 2018

Capita leads the way by putting employees on the board

Capita is to become the first FTSE 250 company since the 1980s to appoint workers to its board of directors.

A recruitment process has been launched today by the company to select two employee directors from its workforce. Employees from across the 70,000-strong global business who have served at least two years will be eligible for the roles and have received an email inviting them to apply.

The chosen employees will be paid the same annual fee and expenses as other non-executive directors. They will have equal authority in strategic decision-making to other directors. The appointments will last for an initial period of two to three years, starting in the second quarter of 2019.

The selection of the employee directors is being overseen independently to ensure a rigorous, objective and open process. Successful applicants will continue their day jobs in parallel with their non-executive roles, while the board will benefit from having an employee’s perspective and expertise on key decisions and strategic thinking.

I’m proud that Capita will be the first company in decades to appoint employees to its board. But this is not a radical move; it’s just the right thing to do. A decade on from the financial crisis and corporate Britain still needs to rebuild trust. Different perspectives at board level are part of that effort. An employee director will bring diversity of thought and strengthen our decision-making. This can only be beneficial for our ongoing transformation programme and, ultimately, shareholders. The employee directors could be found anywhere in our business, whether that’s in software or services, working for the public or private sector, based in Colwyn Bay or Cape Town. This marks us out as a forward-looking company seeking to attract, recruit and retain employees in the competitive, technology-focused environment in which we operate. Workers on boards are an integral part of corporate life in countries such as Sweden and Germany. I don’t see any reason why it can’t also work in this country.

Jon Lewis

Chief executive, Capita

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